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Compliance

Comment Period Opens for CFPB’s New Rule

October 14, 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)’s proposed rule that would give it supervisory authority over larger participants in the nonbank auto finance segment was published in the Federal Register on Oct. 8, kicking off a 60-day public comment period that ends on Dec. 8.

If adopted, the proposed rule would generally allow the CFPB to supervise nonbank auto finance companies that make, acquire, or refinance 10,000 or more loans or leases in a year. The bureau has estimated that about 38 auto finance companies, which originate around 90% of nonbank auto loans and leases, would be subject to this oversight.

“Nonbank auto finance companies extend hundreds of billions of dollars in credit to American consumers, yet they have never been subject to any supervisory oversight at the federal level,” CFPB Director Richard Cordray said at an auto finance hearing on Sept. 18. “These companies have also played a significant role in the growth of subprime auto lending by making loans to consumers with lower credit scores. In this market, as in others, subprime borrowers may be more vulnerable to predatory practices, so direct oversight of their lending practices is essential.”

The CFPB began regulating the auto finance market in March 2013, when it issued a bulletin stating that lenders that offer auto loans through dealerships will be held responsible for discriminatory rate markups on retail installment sales contracts. The regulator has also expressed interest in the marketing of loans and leases, the accuracy of information given to credit bureaus, and the treatment of consumers during debt collection.

The proposed rule is the fifth in a series of rulemaking to define larger participants in consumer financial markets.

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