If you struggle with green salespeople and how they interact with you and the F&I process, invite them to your next menu disclosure — it might just help the new salesperson go from green to great.  - IMAGE: Getty Images

If you struggle with green salespeople and how they interact with you and the F&I process, invite them to your next menu disclosure — it might just help the new salesperson go from green to great. 

IMAGE: Getty Images

What’s your favorite color? Mine is green, except when it comes to salespeople, then not so much.

Instead of getting frustrated with green salespeople, take the initiative to show them your process.

I had a great conversation with an F&I manager recently. We were talking about goals and celebrating some recent improvement in his VSC penetration. I asked if he could see any roadblocks to achieving the new goals he had just shared with me. His response: “The five new salespeople on the floor.” He shared that their deals were usually a mess and took extra effort, the paperwork wasn’t right, and half the time he had to regain a commitment to buy the vehicle from the customer when they came into his office. I’m sure he was exaggerating, but we have all experienced green or untrained salespeople. 

He was ready for my next question: “I know what you are going to ask me, have I spent any time training them?” He then told me that he had been training the new salespeople on paperwork, the introduction to F&I, and so on. He said that some were getting it, but others weren’t. He went on for a while then asked: “How could I get green salespeople to trust the F&I process and take it more seriously?” 

What I suggested to him is something you may want to consider — invite the salespeople into the office one at a time to observe loading a deal, submission for credit, a menu disclosure, gaining commitment, execution of the paperwork, and breaking down the deal for funding. I also suggested that he not do this on one of their deals, instead invite them to observe on one of the other new salesperson’s deliveries. 

By doing so, he could explain the process, illustrate how important complete information is to submission and approval of a deal, and how accurate paperwork contributes to a more efficient delivery. It also gives the new salesperson a better understanding of how incomplete or inaccurate information can slow down the process. The new salesperson will have the opportunity to observe the menu disclosure and how customer concerns are addressed, and commitment is gained. 

Lastly, it could give the new salesperson some insight into the various systems and documentation related to the administrative responsibilities in F&I and why the process takes as long as does.

While introducing yourself to the customer, explain that you would like one of the new salespeople who is in training to observe their delivery. Explain that this will help the new salesperson gain a better understanding of the documentation needed to complete the transfer of ownership of their new vehicle. But remember to ask if they mind — most will not.

It is unfortunate that new salespeople do not always receive the training we would prefer they receive prior to interacting with customers and the F&I office. But think back to the time when you were a new salesperson trying to figure things out without much help. A frustrating time for you I would imagine and if you were anything like I was back then, your managers as well. 

Instead of getting frustrated with green salespeople, take the initiative to show them your process. As I have said before, you can complain or teach. I recommend you choose to teach. 

If you struggle with green salespeople and how they interact with you and the F&I process, invite them to your next menu disclosure. It might just help the new salesperson go from green to great. 

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